Meet Jack Haskins, Legal Intern!

Futurewise is excited to welcome Jack Haskins to our team as our Legal Intern! Jack will be working with our legal team, conducting legal research and writing on legal questions related to compliance with the Growth Management Act and other state laws. Welcome to the team, Jack!

Share a little about your story!

I was born and raised in Seattle, specifically in the Ballard neighborhood. I grew up training pre-professionally in classical ballet at Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB). When it came time to graduate high school and begin my professional dance career, I decided to pursue a different path, believing I could apply myself with greater impact elsewhere. So, in 2023 I graduated from the University of Arizona with a BFA in Dance, a BA in Philosophy, Politics, Economics, and Law, and a minor in Climate Change and Society. In school, I discovered the field of urban planning and completed a senior thesis conducting research on Arizona jurisdictions’ recent planning for extreme heat. That work reinforced my interest in understanding climate policy and statutory interpretation, which I am now delving into as a student at the University of Washington School of Law.

Why do you believe in Futurewise’s work? Why do you think what we do is important?

Futurewise’s advocacy is a wonderful example of the “triple bottom line” of sustainability. The triple bottom line teaches us that in ​an effort to secure a sustainable future for our community, we must find harmony between the intersections of people, planet, and profit. Although the triple bottom line is typically a business-oriented framework, I think Futurewise’s stewardship of the Growth Management Act similarly works as an important focusing tool for Washington jurisdictions navigating development. Through steadfast partnerships with other local advocacy groups and a wealth of professional experience, I believe Futurewise empowers both our governments and residents to center environmental justice in their work.

Share a little bit about the work you do outside of Futurewise.

I just completed my first year in law school at the University of Washington. Being a student has been my primary focus, however I have kept up with the various organizations I worked in as an undergraduate student at Arizona. For three years, I served as the College of Fine Arts Senator in Arizona’s student government. A major part of my tenure in that office was creating an environmental art symposium that engaged the campus and Tucson community. I hope to keep that symposium running, even from afar. I generally try to support the arts, which I have gotten to emphasize as an audience member of PNB since returning home.

What’s your favorite thing about living in Washington?

Unlike many of my fellow Washingtonians, I did not grow up spending a lot of time hiking and camping (although I make up for that now, when possible). However, I did have the privilege of living in a neighborhood with access to local parks and beaches. Walking around the city, meeting new people, and enjoying the beauty of Seattle (natural and otherwise) is still my favorite hobby. Although there are always areas for improvement, I find Seattle to be quite walkable, which I have a greater sense of appreciation for after visiting more parts of the country.

If you could snap your fingers and fix one issue facing our state, what would it be?

Accessibility of stable housing is front of mind for me and several other Washingtonians in my life. Like the climate crisis, housing is such an intersectional topic. I was so invested in contributing to Futurewise because housing justice is a major priority here, and it is an area I look forward to dedicating my career to. At this point, the discourse around housing is a stressor of mine. I wish the general dialogue were more compassionate and emphasized unhoused folks’ perspectives.

Meet Jack Haskins, Legal Intern!

Futurewise is excited to welcome Jack Haskins to our team as our Legal Intern! Jack will be working with our legal team, conducting legal research and writing on legal questions related to compliance with the Growth Management Act and other state laws. Welcome to the team, Jack!

Share a little about your story!

I was born and raised in Seattle, specifically in the Ballard neighborhood. I grew up training pre-professionally in classical ballet at Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB). When it came time to graduate high school and begin my professional dance career, I decided to pursue a different path, believing I could apply myself with greater impact elsewhere. So, in 2023 I graduated from the University of Arizona with a BFA in Dance, a BA in Philosophy, Politics, Economics, and Law, and a minor in Climate Change and Society. In school, I discovered the field of urban planning and completed a senior thesis conducting research on Arizona jurisdictions’ recent planning for extreme heat. That work reinforced my interest in understanding climate policy and statutory interpretation, which I am now delving into as a student at the University of Washington School of Law.

Why do you believe in Futurewise’s work? Why do you think what we do is important?

Futurewise’s advocacy is a wonderful example of the “triple bottom line” of sustainability. The triple bottom line teaches us that in ​an effort to secure a sustainable future for our community, we must find harmony between the intersections of people, planet, and profit. Although the triple bottom line is typically a business-oriented framework, I think Futurewise’s stewardship of the Growth Management Act similarly works as an important focusing tool for Washington jurisdictions navigating development. Through steadfast partnerships with other local advocacy groups and a wealth of professional experience, I believe Futurewise empowers both our governments and residents to center environmental justice in their work.

Share a little bit about the work you do outside of Futurewise.

I just completed my first year in law school at the University of Washington. Being a student has been my primary focus, however I have kept up with the various organizations I worked in as an undergraduate student at Arizona. For three years, I served as the College of Fine Arts Senator in Arizona’s student government. A major part of my tenure in that office was creating an environmental art symposium that engaged the campus and Tucson community. I hope to keep that symposium running, even from afar. I generally try to support the arts, which I have gotten to emphasize as an audience member of PNB since returning home.

What’s your favorite thing about living in Washington?

Unlike many of my fellow Washingtonians, I did not grow up spending a lot of time hiking and camping (although I make up for that now, when possible). However, I did have the privilege of living in a neighborhood with access to local parks and beaches. Walking around the city, meeting new people, and enjoying the beauty of Seattle (natural and otherwise) is still my favorite hobby. Although there are always areas for improvement, I find Seattle to be quite walkable, which I have a greater sense of appreciation for after visiting more parts of the country.

If you could snap your fingers and fix one issue facing our state, what would it be?

Accessibility of stable housing is front of mind for me and several other Washingtonians in my life. Like the climate crisis, housing is such an intersectional topic. I was so invested in contributing to Futurewise because housing justice is a major priority here, and it is an area I look forward to dedicating my career to. At this point, the discourse around housing is a stressor of mine. I wish the general dialogue were more compassionate and emphasized unhoused folks’ perspectives.

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Introducing Our New Interview Series   The perk of my job as Futurewise’s State Organizer is getting to work with folks from a wide variety of diverse backgrounds– rural, urban, and everything in between. It’s a constant reminder that where … Continue reading

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